Your Weekend Frankenstein, Oct 20-21

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This weekend, let’s take you through some classics of Frankenstein rock. Above, from Edgar Winter. Continue reading

The Evil of Frankenstein

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The Evil of Frankenstein

Year: 1964
Writers: Anthony Hinds
Director: Freddy Francis
Notable Cast: Peter Cushing, Sandor Elès, Peter Woodthorpe, Katy Wild, Duncan Lamont, Kiwi Kingston,
PlotPenniless, Baron Frankenstein, accompanied by his eager assistant Hans, arrives at his family castle near the town of Karlstaad, vowing to continue his experiments in the creation of life. Fortuitously finding the creature he was previously working on, he brings it back to a semblance of life but requires the services of a mesmerist, Zoltan, to successfully animate it. The greedy and vengeful Zoltan secretly sends the monster into town to steal gold and ‘punish’ the burgomaster and the chief of police, which acts lead to a violent confrontation between the baron and the townspeople. (SOURCE: IMDB and Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net> )

As much of a fan as I claim to be of Hammer Horror, I never really delved into their Frankenstein output, always too dazzled by their sexy vampires and tales of black magic. So, when Evil of Frankenstein was available on STARZ, I delved.  A little research revealed that it’s not well regarded within Hammer’s Frankenstein series. Perhaps with a few more under my belt I will change my tune, and yet, I liked this a lot. Continue reading

Don’t Dream It, Victor

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There’s not much I can add to illuminate what’s known and what’s loved about Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Picture Show. I’m pretty sure that if you are reading this, you know this movie and its music all too well.

Maybe I can offer this: Dr. Frankenfurter is the fabulous ultimate expression of Mary Shelley’s Victor Frankenstein. Where one is an odious, cowardly mass of 19th century anxieties and weak egotism, the other’s rampant self-centeredness is perfect and glorious. Both scientists create their own downfalls, but only one does it with heels and fishnets, and with a lack of remorse that’s honest and goddamn decadent. Continue reading

Your Weekend Frankenstein, Oct 13-14: The Public Domains of Horror!

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This weekend, enjoy the very first film adaptation of Frankenstein ever made! This 1910 short was discovered in the mid-1970’s, is twelve minutes long, and I like it a lot. I especially enjoyed the creepy, phantasmagoric creation sequence of the monster around the four-minute mark. And the monster itself is more nightmarish than the bolts-and-stitches model engineered by Universal Studios two decades later.
Continue reading

You Best Believe I’m in Love, L-U-V

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Silvia Hoeks as Luv, Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049

I think the Blade Runner series fits quite well in the canon of fiction inspired by Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, even if Philip K. Dick’s mind wandered elsewhere.

Human beings with god complexes creating biological, artificial lives and being horrible parents? Alienated and angry offspring suffering and murdering for their parents’ sins? It was all there when Rutger Hauer’s Roy kissed his creator on the lips. Continue reading

The Frankenstein Chronicles

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Season 1 of the ITV Encore production of The Frankenstein Chronicles contains science fiction/supernatural horror. It develops very slowly but its final reveal is utterly devastating.  Primarily, it is a complicated police procedural drama, and one of the most creative adaptations of Mary Shelley’s novel I’ve seen. Avoiding the dazzle of and focus on a created monster, it gives us no shortage of human ones. Perhaps a long and frustrating journey (you need a bit of patience and attention to get through the season), but one well worth taking. Continue reading

This Monster, This Superhero

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This panel moved me. She wants to join Frankenstein in the battle against evil. We all want to take up arms and live a life of superheroic adventure.

In 2004 Chaos magician and rock star comic book creator Grant Morrison brought to life a vibrant, weird and understated superhero magnum opus: Seven Soldiers.

Morrison took the name of an old Golden Age superhero team (The Seven Soldiers of Victory) and he took inspiration from a 1970’s period in DC Comics where strange, lush horror comics were en vogue. Continue reading