This Monster, This Superhero

1
Girl frankenstein

This panel moved me. She wants to join Frankenstein in the battle against evil. We all want to take up arms and live a life of superheroic adventure.

In 2004 Chaos magician and rock star comic book creator Grant Morrison brought to life a vibrant, weird and understated superhero magnum opus: Seven Soldiers.

Morrison took the name of an old Golden Age superhero team (The Seven Soldiers of Victory) and he took inspiration from a 1970’s period in DC Comics where strange, lush horror comics were en vogue. Continue reading

Advertisements

Lumbering Doofus or Ninja? (Frankenstein, Chapters 22-24)

0

 

vallejofrank

Cover of Tor Books edition of Frankenstein by fantasy art master Boris Vallejo

In the home stretch, and here are my takeaways on the end of the novel! Of course, I don’t really have much more to say, not about Vic all of a sudden becoming a self-righteous avenger of justice, dramatically appealing to “spirits” etc etc.  What a drama queen! I don’t have much to say about the showdown in the Arctic, either, except that Vic kills a lot of huskies trying to chase the Monster. Nope, not a whole lotta sympathy from me, gotta tell ya. It also looks like Captain Walton is developing a man-crush or more on Vic. Find another thing, Walton. Continue reading

Milton, Geo-politics and Romantic Procrastination in Scotland! (Frankenstein, Chapters 15-21)

0

6d9d5-magnumeasyeye-frankenstein

 

Here is one of the most fascinating segments of Shelley’s novel, where the Monster, far from the image of the lumbering idiot that Universal Studios imprinted upon popular culture, eloquently relates his tale and reveals a depth of thought and soul that is heartbreaking. Actually, this all began at around Chapter 10 – where the Monster stalks, helps, learns from and is rejected by a poor and virtuous family, the De Laceys-  but I will address it here.

My takeaways: Continue reading

Natural Vistas, Child-Care Panic and the Monster Speaks! (Frankenstein, Chapters 8-14)

0

 

frank5

1882 cover of the  George Routledge & Sons edition of Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. The Monster is looking like a Yankee Doodle Dandy.

 

My takeaways from Chapters 8 through 14 of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus: Continue reading

Get Agrippa! Thoughts on Chapters 1-7 of Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus

0

franken1

No plot recaps: that would be tedious reading. For a summary of what happens in these chapters, click here. Instead, I offer what I noticed, what made me curious and what made me react.

Let me add that when I first read Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus I may have been in 7th or 8th grade, and as much as this type of literature can be a pain in the ass to a feckless tween boy in search of horror thrills, I fell head first into it and got through it smoothly. I loved it. Continue reading

Frankenstein IS…

0

 

Curse_of_Frankenstein_1957B

Screenshot from The Curse of Frankenstein, 1957 (source: Wikimedia commons)

I settled on a theme for my 31 Days of Halloween blogging project, and it will revolve around a classic monster and one hell of a novel.

I don’t know what kind of place Frankenstein has in modern horror movements (it does have a very important one) but at the dawn of horror cinema and Gothic literature, the man and the monster were there. The novel’s transcendent ideas have seeped into all kinds of fictions, possibly more than we can imagine.

I’m going to take a dive on this blog (not a terribly deep one), but I’ll start with some basic, 9th grade English class research – a Google of all kinds of thematic guides to help you write papers.

Frankenstein is…

Continue reading